Tata Despina

Associate Professor
Department of Cognition, Brain and Behavior
Area of Expertise: Biopsychology
Room: 208, Old Building, Faculty of Philosophy
Landline: +302310997369

Despina Tata completed her undergraduate studies in the department of Philosophy, Education and Psychology in Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and her postgraduate education in Aristotle University (MA in Cognitive Psychology) and State University of New York at Stony Brook (MA in Biopsychology). She was awarded a PhD degree in Biopsychology (2004, State University of New York at Stony Brook, USA, advisor: Dr. B.J. Anderson) followed by a 3-year training as post-doctoral research associate in Boston University (2004-2007, Laboratory of Neurochemistry, advisor: Dr. B.K. Yamamoto). Dr. Tata’s  research focuses on the effects of psychological stress on brain and behavior. Specifically, she studies the impact of stress on brain neuroanatomy and neurochemistry, as well as on learning, memory and emotion-related behaviors. In addition, she explores the neuroprotective role of specific environmental manipulations, such as living in enriched environmental conditions, against the negative impact of stress at a neuroanatomical, neurochemical and behavioral level. She has extended experience in preclinical behavioral testing, neuroanatomy (light and electron microscopy), and biochemical techniques (HPLC, Western blots, in vivo Microdialysis, Immunohistochemistry).

My research interests lie in the area of Behavioral Neuroscience/ Biopsychology. I am particularly interested in exploring the effects of psychological stress on brain and behavior using animal models. Specifically, I explore the impact of stress on brain neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, as well as on learning, memory and emotion-related behaviors. In addition, my research concerns the neuroprotective role of specific environmental manipulations, such as living in enriched environmental conditions, against the negative impact of stress at the neuroanatomical, neurochemical and behavioral level.

Λέξεις κλειδιά: psychological stress, environmental enrichment, limbic system, neuroanatomy, neuronal plasticity, behavior

Tata, D.A., Dandi, E., & Spandou, E.  (2021). Expression of synaptophysin and BDNF in the medial prefrontal cortex following early-life stress and neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Developmental Psychobiology, 63(2), 173-182. doi: 10.1002/dev.22011.

Dandi, E., Kalamari, A., Touloumi, O., Lagoudaki, R., Nousiopoulou, E., Simeonidou, C., Spandou, E., Tata, D.A. (2018). The role of environmental enrichment following maternal separation: effects on behavior, stress reactivity and synaptophysin / BDNF expression in hippocampus. International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience, 67, 19-32.

Tata, D.Α.  Markostamou, Ι., Ioannidis, A., Gkioka, M., Simeonidou, C., Anogianakis, G., & Spandou, E. (2015). Effects of Maternal Separation on Behavior and Brain Damage in Adult Rats Exposed to Neonatal Ηypoxia-Ιschemia. Behavioural Brain Research, 280, 51-61.

Ιωαννίδης, Α., & Τατά, Δ. Α. (2013). Επιπτώσεις του Μητρικού Αποχωρισμού στη Γνωστική Λειτουργία και σε Δείκτες Νευρογένεσης και Νευρωνικής Ευπλαστότητας σε Πειραματικά Μοντέλα Ζώων. Ελεύθερνα, Eπιστημονική Eπετηρίδα του Τμήματος Ψυχολογίας, 6, 175-207. Πανεπιστήμιο Κρήτης.

Tata, D.A. (2012). Maternal Separation as a Model of Early Stress: Effects on Aspects of Emotional Behavior and Neuroendocrine Function. Hellenic Journal of Psychology, 9, 84-101.

Tata, D.A., & Anderson, B. J. (2010). The effects of chronic glucocorticoid exposure on dendritic length, synapse numbers and glial volume in animal models: implications for hippocampal volume reductions in depression. Physiology & Behavior, 99(2), 186-193.

Anderson, B. J., McCloskey, D. P., Mitchell, N. A., & Tata, D.A. (2009).  Exercise Effects on Learning and Neural Systems.  In W. J. Chodzko-Zajko, A. F. Kramer, & L. W. Poon (Eds), Enhancing Cognitive Functioning and Brain Plasticity. Series: Aging, Exercise, and Cognition, Vol. 3 (pp. 61-84).  Champaign: Human Kinetics Publishers.

Tata, D.A., & Yamamoto, B. K. (2008). Chronic stress enhances methamphetamine-induced extracellular glutamate and excitotoxicity in the rat striatum. Synapse, 62 (5), 325-336.